Society at a Breaking Point: The Pareto Efficiency and a Fair Distribution of Resources by Nora Dell

In 2017, the top 10% of Americans (families with incomes above $130,000) received 50.5% of national income; an all-time high, up from 32.1% in 1954 and 49% in 1929. The fact that the United States has surpassed Gilded Age levels of income inequality has many people asking; how can we restore our traditional ideals like … Continue reading Society at a Breaking Point: The Pareto Efficiency and a Fair Distribution of Resources by Nora Dell

The Inconvenient Truth Behind Convenience: How the “Gig Economy” may have adverse consequences on the future of employment by Yifan Feng

Want to get somewhere? Call an Uber or Lyft. Sick of dining hall food? Order via Caviar. College students are increasingly turning to these new online to offline business in which the touch of a button becomes goods and services right on their doorstep. Consumers have enthusiastically embraced the benefits of these touch-and-go services, but … Continue reading The Inconvenient Truth Behind Convenience: How the “Gig Economy” may have adverse consequences on the future of employment by Yifan Feng

Minimum wage, unemployment, and poverty in South Africa by Susanna McGrew

A host of statistics show that South African labor markets are not working for most South Africans. The country has had extremely high unemployment for decades – 2016 estimates put unemployment at 26.7% of the population, or 36.3% including discouraged workers. Making matters worse for many, the unemployment distributed unequally. More than half of young … Continue reading Minimum wage, unemployment, and poverty in South Africa by Susanna McGrew

Guns, Blood and Stocks: How do wars affect stock prices? By Mia Sasagawa

The stock market reacts to uncertainty - and there’s nothing more uncertain than a stray missile, or full-blown geopolitical conflict and warfare. Financial media outlets thrill to feed into alarmist sentiment surrounding an impeding war. But should equity investors be daunted in their investment brevity in the face of a potential war threat? We turn … Continue reading Guns, Blood and Stocks: How do wars affect stock prices? By Mia Sasagawa

Peeling Away the Layers: Why the Principle-Agent Model is Controversial for the IMF and World Bank by Kimberly Milligan

In 2000, thousands in Washington D.C protested inequitable globalization at annual IMF and World Bank meetings. In 2015, people of Lima rallied to protest international organization interventions that compound extraction of resources. The World Bank and IMF’s missions are to facilitate meaningful international cooperation. So then, why do they face such harsh criticism over their … Continue reading Peeling Away the Layers: Why the Principle-Agent Model is Controversial for the IMF and World Bank by Kimberly Milligan

Why Are Medical Care and College Tuition getting so expensive?

The cost of medical care and college tuition have skyrocketed for the past few decades. Since 1978, the cost of medical care has risen approximately 7 times, and college tuition has risen almost 12.5 times, while consumer prices and average wages have only risen 3 times as much. This means that health care and college … Continue reading Why Are Medical Care and College Tuition getting so expensive?

The Debate: What’s Your Stand on Labor Standards?

Lyncy Nyandoche, Bryn Mawr '21 In the first six months of office the Trump administration repealed the Obama workplace rule which required companies to disclose any labor violations that they have committed when applying for federal contracts. Furthermore, it removed the obligation of employers to accurately record their worker’s injuries and illness and thus reduced … Continue reading The Debate: What’s Your Stand on Labor Standards?

Should We Be Afraid of a Trade Deficit?

Zhongxuan Wang, Bryn Mawr '21 The recent trade war between the U.S. and China has ignited attention around the world as President Trump on March 22, 2018 signed a memo instructing the government to impose $60 billion in tariffs and institute tighter restrictions on acquisitions and technology transfers. The Chinese government in response unveiled plans … Continue reading Should We Be Afraid of a Trade Deficit?

The South-South Cooperation model in the African Continent

Convergence* or what has been referred to lately as “The “C” word”, has not taken place despite many scholars’ anticipation. The Trickle-down economics proved to be –but a compelling narrative to back-up the modernization thesis and to legitimize the liberal neo-imperial agendas of the developed west. It seems that it takes more than time to … Continue reading The South-South Cooperation model in the African Continent